Dry sclerophyll forest shrubs on Black Mountain

Acacia buxifolia
Acacia buxifolia (RP)

Box-leaved Wattle

This is a spreading shrub to 1.5 m tall with bluish-green leaves 1-3 cm long and 2-8 mm wide, and clusters of bright yellow globular flower heads. It produces vegetative regrowth after fire, and shows fire-stimulated seed germination.

Pomaderris intermedia
Acacia buxifolia (RP)

Lemon Dogwood

This is an erect shrub to 2.5 m tall. Its leaves are 4-11 cm long, 14-40 mm wide, dark green and hairless on the upper side and whitish and hairy below. The bright yellow flowers each 5 mm long form dense clusters. The plants can produce vegetative regrowth after low intensity fires. The species is rare in the ACT.

Acacia genistifolia
Acacia genistifolia (RP)

Early Wattle

This is an erect to spreading shrub to 2 metres tall with rigid needle-tipped leaves to 3 cm long and 1-3 mm wide. One or two pale yellow globular flower heads grow in the leaf axils. The plants are killed by fire, and the species relies on fire-stimulated seed germination for recovery afterwards.

Dillwynia phylicoides
Dillwynia phylicoides (RP)

Small-leaved Parrotpea

This is an erect shrub to 1.5 m high, with a single stem at ground level. Its leaves are 3-8 mm long, less than 1 mm wide, and have a spiral twist. The orange or yellow-and-red pea-shaped flowers often form tight clusters at the ends of branchlets. The plants are killed by fire, and the species relies on fire-stimulated seed germination for recovery afterwards.

Brachyloma daphnoides
Brachyloma daphnoides (RP)

Daphne Heath

This is a shrub usually less than 1 m tall, with many stems from ground level. Its leaves are 4-10 mm long, 2-4 mm wide and have parallel veins. The whitish coloured flowers have a narrow tube 4-6 mm long with five lobes 1-3 mm long at the tip. The plants produce vegetative regrowth after fire.

Pultenaea procumbens
Pultenaea procumbens (RP)

Heathy Bushpea

This is a low spreading subshrub usually less than 30 cm high. Its leaves are 3-10 mm long, 1-4 mm wide, strongly concave, and have a stiff bristle at the tip. The pea-shaped flowers are orange and occur in dense clusters at the end of branchlets. The plants produce vegetative regrowth after fire.

Dodonaea viscosa subsp. spatulata
Dodonaea viscosa subsp. spatulata (RP)

Broad-leaved Hop Bush

This is a straggly shrub to 2 m high. Its leaves are 2-5 cm long, 4-10 mm wide, and broadest towards the end. It has small green male and female flowers that grow on separate plants. The fruits have 3 or 4 wings each 3-10 mm wide, and turn purplish as they mature. The plants are killed by fire, and the species relies on seed germination for recovery afterwards.

Cassinia longifolia
Cassinia longifolia (RP)

Cauliflower Bush

This is a rounded shrub to 2.5 m tall, often with several stems from ground level. It has aromatic leaves 4-8 cm long and 2-6 mm wide that may be sticky to touch. Its white flower heads form dense, flat-topped clusters. The plants produce vegetative regrowth after fire.

Mirbelia oxylobioides
Acacia buxifolia (RP)

Mountain Mirbelia

This is a rounded to erect shrub to 1.5 m tall. Its leaves are to 1 cm long, 3 mm wide and often occur in whorls of three. The pea-shaped flowers have yellow and red petals. The plants produce vegetative regrowth after fire.

Grevillea alpina
Acacia buxifolia (RP)

Mountain Grevillea

This is a spreading to semi-prostrate shrub less than 1 m tall. Its leaves are slightly hairy, 1-2 cm long and 2-10 mm wide. The red flowers are hairy on the outside, and have a short curved tube with smaller rounded lobes at the end. The plants produce vegetative regrowth after fire.

Ngunnawal Plant Use

Ngunnawal Plant Use provides information on the native plants of the ACT region and their many Ngunnawal uses.

The ACT’s traditional owners, the Ngunnawal people, used and continue to use the plant resources of this region for food, medicine, tools and weapons, fire, ceremonial purposes, water, fibre, dye and paint.

The robust, full-colour, A5, spiral-bound, 96-page field guide includes:

  • an introduction to Ngunnawal history and natural resource use
  • a guide to using the book
  • descriptions and photos of 69 plant species, including their Ngunnawal use, distribution, and method of propagation
  • further reading and references

Read more on the ACT Environment and Planning Directorate website.

Photographers: MF = Murray Fagg; RP = Rosemary Purdie

 

ACT Parks and Conservation Friends of Black Mountain Molonglo Catchment Group   ACT Government This project was supported with funding made available by the ACT Government under the ACT Heritage Grants Program.